Awards


Homer I. Bernhardt Distinguished Service Award

Established in 1990. Each year at the ASEE Annual Conference, the Engineering Libraries Division presents an award, consisting of a plaque, that recognizes work that contributes to the advancement and development of excellence in engineering libraries.

Homer I. Bernhardt was, from 1966 until his untimely death in 1982, head of the Bevier Engineering Library at the University of Pittsburgh. Homer Bernhardt’s professional activities contributed to engineering and librarianship at Pitt and at ASEE. His commitment to the field is recognized in ELD’s decision to name its Distinguished Service Award in his memory. Read the complete history of the Bernhardt Award.

Eligibility

Membership in ASEE is not an eligibility requirement for this award.

How to Nominate

Award nominations must include the name, title, and contact information of the nominee and nominator, nomination rationale statement, and a curriculum vitae of the nominee. The rationale statement should not exceed 700 words and should clearly indicate why the candidate is being nominated for this award. Letters of support from individuals besides the person making the nomination may be included.

Deadline

Nominations, along with all required materials, must be received by February 8th by the ASEE/ELD Awards Committee chair.

 

Bernhardt Award recipients with biographies

 

 


Best Publication Award

The purpose of this award is to honor the best new paper or non-reference monographic work in engineering information.

Award History

Established 1998.

Criteria

1. Single or multiple authors are eligible. Works authored by Awards Committee members are ineligible during the members’ term of service.

2. Work must have been published during the year prior to the year in which the award will be made.

3. Work should represent a significant contribution to the field of engineering information. Work should be scholarly, show evidence of thorough research, documentation, and critical evaluation. It should be clearly written and well organized.

Send nominations by February 8th to the ASEE/ELD Awards Committee Chair.

Recipients

2018: Elizabeth A. Berman. “An Exploratory Sequential Mixed Methods Approach to Understanding Researchers’ Data Management Practices at UVM: Integrated Findings to Develop Research Data Services.” Journal of eScience Librarianship

This article was rated as top quality by most members of the Awards committee in all areas of review, including scholarly, evidence of thorough research, documentation, and critical evaluation. It addition, this is a well designed and very well written research paper that reports the needs analysis study at the University of Vermont, which clearly finds and articulates multiple needs and expectations that have been encountered by librarians who have considered or started working with data services. While not surprising, Berman points out that the growth of library supported research data services requires “engaging with administration and faculty researchers about the role libraries can play in data management, as well as the need for collaboration with more ‘visible’ stakeholders on campus”. While the research is specific to UVM, and explicitly states there is no one size fits all solution for data services, there are many points that resonate across a variety of campuses, both large research institutions and smaller colleges.

2017:  Megan Sapp Nelson. “Using Altmetrics as an Engineering Faculty Outreach Tool”, Proceedings of the ASEE 2016 Annual Conference, New Orleans, LA

As one committee member stated “My top choice…mainly because our faculty members need education and instructional sessions from liaison librarians about what altmetrics is and how it can help them in scientific communication of their research worldwide quickly. Megan writes: ‘Liaisons have a unique opportunity to help faculty to tailor their energy and time usage based upon their personal goals’ and ‘Librarians can then provide advice upon the dissemination routes that have corresponding altmetrics that can demonstrate the impact of the faculty members’ alternative scholarly communication efforts.’ Megan has clearly highlighted the importance of altmetrics as a new and emerging trend in scholarly communication and it is becoming a ‘need’ for our research to learn both positive and negative aspects of it. For liaison librarians, it can be a useful opportunity to reach out among their faculty members. Clearly, this needs to be recognized. Therefore, this paper is my top priority. More researchers quickly informed about new research can even foster quick networking and connections which may ultimately speed up new research and in the process contributing to global benefits.”

Megan is a (soon-to-be) Professor of Library Sciences at Purdue University Libraries in West Lafayette Indiana.

2016: Qinqin Zhang, Maren Goodman, and Shiyi Xie. “Integrating Library Instruction into the Course Management System for a First-Year Engineering Class: An Evidence-Based Study Measuring the Effectiveness of Blended Learning on Students’ Information Literacy Levels”, College & Research Libraries, November 2015, 934-958.

The Awards Committee found that this paper stood out for several reasons. One committee member commented “This is a very relevant paper as many of us are struggling with a way to engage with undergraduate engineering students in a way that will be more engaging and also address different learning styles and preferences. Their point that blended learning modules can provide an opening to work more closely with course instructors, too, is an added benefit for moving away from a traditional lecture mode. The inclusion of the appendixes that support this work was very much appreciated, as is the extensive bibliography.” Another member concisely described the article as “Very thorough, great methodology, good literature review, availability of pre and post-test for comparison, and a very timely topic.”

Qinqin Zhang, Maren Goodman, and Shiyi Xie Qinqin Zhang and Shiyi Xie are Research and Instructional Services Librarians at the University of Western Ontario; Maren Goodman is a Clinical Librarian at London Health Sciences Centre.

2015: Fosmire, Michael and David Radcliffe. Integrating Information into the Engineering Design Process. Purdue University Press, 2014.

A librarian who nominated the book stated this about it: “[The book] has been indispensable for me this year. I am a relatively new engineering librarian and this book helped me greatly in understanding the needs of engineers when they are undertaking their capstone projects. It also was very helpful to me when preparing workshops for students. Although I’ve only had the book for less than year, it is already well worn from constantly reading and rereading it.” A member of the Award Committee commented, “I don’t know of any other book like this – I know I’ll be referring to it often in my own instruction work, and referring engineering faculty to it.”

In addition to being for sale through Purdue University Press, the book became available through Open Access in January, 2015. The book can be found on the Purdue University Press E-Books site.

2014: Kirkwood, Patricia Elaine (University of Arkansas) and Necia T. Parker-Gibson (University of Arkansas). Informing Chemical Engineering Decisions with Data, Research, and Government Resources, published by Morgan & Claypool Publishers as book #1 of the Synthesis Lectures on Chemical Engineering and Biochemical Engineering, 2013.

An Award Committee member noted, “This is an excellent resource both for librarians new to chemical/agricultural engineering and to new researchers. The case studies are excellent, with multifaceted questions – and one of them uses only free resources. The book’s focus on real-world uses for information will speak to engineers. I think its usefulness extends beyond undergraduates – it would be very helpful to newly employed engineers, and parts of it are also relevant for graduate students or faculty who are looking for ways to broaden their search habits.” Other comments were “…they made a topic that often is overlooked easy or easier to understand – chemistry & chemical engineering is often intimidating to science librarians. I think they disentangled the obvious and made research methods in those fields compelling and noting best practices.” and “As someone who is not all that familiar with chemical engineering, I can see myself coming back to this article (and recommending it to others).”

2013: Naimpally, Ashok (Fresno City College), Hema Ramachandran (California State University—Long Beach), and Caroline Smith (University of Nevada Las Vegas). Lifelong Learning for Engineers and Scientists in the Information Age, published by Elsevier.

As one nominator said in her letter of nomination, “This slim volume of just 91 pages brings into juxtaposition the goals and realities of engineering education and of teaching information literacy, marking points of logical intersection and providing suggestions for both librarians and engineering educators to take advantage of those. Engineering curricula are extensive and intense, and ABET accreditation standards require tangible evidence of a wide range of outcomes including ‘an ability to engage in lifelong learning.’ The authors of this book have mapped out both ABET criteria and ACRL information literacy standards, and have identified where definitions of lifelong learning and selected competencies in each are in concert.” “The book is deceptive in its brevity; each succinct chapter concludes with a list of references providing a wealth of further information and examples to explore.“ An Award Committee member found it “a great resource” and that it “includes great talking points for librarians to use when discussing the importance of information literacy with faculty and practicing engineers.”

2012: Carlson, Jacob, Michael Fosmire, C.C. Miller, Megan Sapp Nelson. “Determining Data Information Literacy Needs: A Study of Students and Research Faculty”. portal: Libraries and the Academy, 11(2):629-657, April 2011.

2011: Conkling, Thomas, Kevin Harwell, Cheryl McCallips, Sylvia Nyana and Bonnie Osif. “Research Material Selection in the Pre-Web and Post-Web Environments: An Interdiscplinary Study of Bibliographic Citation in Doctoral Dissertations”. The Journal of Academic Librarianship, 36(1):20-31, Jan 2010.

2010: Lafferty, Meghan. “A Framework for Evaluating Science and Technology Electronic Reference Books: A Comparison of Five Platforms in Chemistry“. Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship, Number 59: Fall, 2009.

2009: Meier, John and Thomas Conkling. “Google Scholar’s Coverage of the Engineering Literature: An Empirical Study“. The Journal of Academic Librarianship, 34(3):196-201, 2008.

2008: Nelson, Megan S. “Initiating Engineering Outreach Reference Services: Background and Practice.” Reference Services Review, 35(2):265-284, 2007.

2007: Williams, Virginia Kay and Christine Lea Fletcher. “Materials Used by Master’s Students in Engineering and Implications for Collection Development: A Citation Analysis.” Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship, 45: Winter (2006).

2006<: Okudan-Kremer, Gül E. and Bonnie A. Osif. “Effect of Guided Research Experience on Product Design Performance.” Journal of Engineering Education v.94, no. 2 (2005):255-262. (Access to pdf requires ASEE membership.)

2005: Tenopir, Carol, Donald W. King. Communication Patterns of Engineers. Piscataway, NJ : IEEE Press ; Hoboken, NJ : Wiley-Interscience, 2004.

2004: Oxnam, Maliaca. (2003) “The Informed Engineer.”, In: 33rd ASEE/IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference, November 5-8, 2003, Boulder, CO, pp. F1E-5 – F1E-8, Piscataway, N.J. : IEEE.

2003: Lawal, Ibironke (Ronke). “Scholarly Communication: The Use and Non-Use of E-Print Archives for the Dissemination of Scientific Information“, Issues in Science & Technology Librarianship 36 Fall (2002).

2002: Nerz, Honora F. and Suzanne T. Weiner “Information Competencies: A Strategic Approach.” Proceedings of the ASEE 2001 Annual Conference, Albuquerque, NM.

2001: Cohen, Ari. “ESL: Engineering Societies Library: End of a Special Library.” Science and Technology Libraries, Vol. 19 No.1 (2000).

2000: Lin, Poping. “Core Information Competencies Redefined: A Study of the Information Education of Engineers,” Leading Ideas 11, pp. 2-7.

1999: Conkling, Tom and Kelly Jordan “Enhancing NTIS Database Access at a Multi Campus University.” Science & Technology Libraries 16(2):27-35.

1998: Weiner, Suzanne. “Librarians as teaching team members in a mechanical engineering senior design course.” Science and Technology Libraries 16(1):3-10.


Best Reference Work Award

The purpose of this award was to honor the best new reference work in engineering information.

Award History

Established 1998, ceased 2010. Replaced by the Innovation in Access to Engineering Information Award.

Criteria

1. Single or multiple authors are eligible. Works authored by Awards Committee members are ineligible during the members’ term of service.

2. Reference works must have been published during the previous two years prior to the year in which the award will be made.

3. Reference works should represent a significant contribution to the field of engineering information.

4. Works in all media are eligible.

Recipients

2008: Synthesis Digital Library of Engineering and Computer Science, Collection I.

2007: Osif, Bonnie A. Using the Engineering Literature. Routledge studies in library and information science, 1. London: Routledge, 2006

2006: Information Sources in Engineering, 4th ed., edited by Roderick A. MacLeod and Jim Corlett. München : K.G. Saur, 2005.

2005: Encyclopedia of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, edited by Hari Singh Nalwa. Stevenson Ranch, Calif. : American Scientific Publishers, 2004.

2004: Comprehensive Structural Integrity, edited by Ian Milne; Robert O. Ritchie; Bhushan L. Karihaloo. Amsterdam ; Boston : Elsevier/Pergamon, 2003.

2003: Encyclopedia of Polymer Science and Technology, edited by Jacqueline I. Kroschwitz. 3rd edition. John Wiley: Hoboken, NJ, 2002 & 2003.

2002: International Encyclopedia of Ergonomics and Human Factors, edited by Waldemar Karwowski. New York: Taylor and Francis, 2001.

2001: ENGnetBase, a collection of full text handbooks published by CRC Press.

2000: McGraw-Hill Concise Encyclopedia of Science and Technology, 4th edition, 1998, edited by Sybil P. Parker.

1999: The Encyclopedia of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, edited by John G. Webster. New York: Wiley and Sons.

1998: Perry’s Chemical Engineers’ Handbook, 7th ed. Robert H. Perry, editor; Don W. Green and James O. Maloney, associate editors. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1997.


Innovation in Access to Engineering Information Award

The purpose of this award is to honor innovation in access to engineering information.

Criteria

1. Awarded to a person or entity for the creation of a resource, service or tool in any format that provides innovation in accessing, utilizing, or presenting engineering information. Members of the Award Committee are ineligible during the members’ term of service.

2. The resource, service or tool must have become available during the two years previous to the year in which the award will be made.

3. The resource, service or tool should represent a significant contribution to the field of engineering information.

4. Resources in all media are eligible.

Recipients

2012-2018: Not awarded.

2011: Eugene Barsky, for digitizing and creating open access to 30 years of symposium proceedings of the British Columbia Technical and Research Committee on Reclamation.


ELD Best Poster Award

The Best Poster Award recognizes the presenter(s) who display(s) a clear, well-organized poster that most effectively conveys the content of the poster.

Award History

Established 2006.

Criteria

1. Single or multiple presenters are eligible.

2. Presenters need not be members of ELD, but must be members of ASEE.

3. Posters presented by Awards Committee members are ineligible during the members’ term of service.

4. Poster must be presented during the ELD Poster Session time slot at the annual ASEE National Conference at which the award will be made.

Judging

Content

  • Poster should be a solid, quality, complete piece of work.
  • Poster should convey clearly and concisely the information to the reader.
  • Poster should exhibit originality and be relevant to engineering librarianship.

Presentation

  • Poster should be arranged in an organized and understandable form. The flow of the text and visuals should be easy to follow.
  • Visual aids should enhance the understandability of the poster’s content.
  • Handouts are encouraged and should explain, interpret, extend, and/or synthesize the content of the poster.

Presence

  • Presenter(s) should be present to discuss the poster.
  • Presenter(s) should show interest and enthusiasm in the poster’s content.
  • Presenter(s) should communicate effectively the major points of the poster and answer questions about the poster’s content.

Deadline

Same as the deadline for submission of abstracts in the ASEE electronic submission system, usually the first week of October. Award will be presented at the ELD Annual Meeting at the ASEE Annual Conference or, in the event the ELD Annual Meeting occurs prior to the ELD Poster Session, at the last ELD session prior to the ELD EEC Meeting.

Recipients

2018: Engineering Graduate Student Information Literacy: Are We Meeting the Need?” Ms. Leena N Lalwani, Jamie M. Niehof, and Mr. Paul F. Grochowski (University of Michigan)

2016: “Modification of the House of Quality to Assess Information Gaps during Quality Function Deployment of Engineering”, Chelsea Leachman and Jacob William Leachman (Washington State University).

2015: No posters submitted.

2014: Embedding Video-Based Learning Modules for Library Research Methods in an Online Graduate Engineering Program, Jeffery L. Loo (University of California, Berkeley), Lisa T.Ngo (University of California, Berkeley), Cody K. Hennesy (University of California, Berkeley), Brian D. Quigley (University of California, Berkeley), Jean McKenzie (University of California, Berkeley).

2013: Beyond JEE: Finding Publication Venues to Get Your Message to the ‘Right’ Audience, Amy Van Epps (Purdue University).

2012: No posters submitted.

2011: The Hybrid Reference Desk: Changing Strategies for Changing Times, Larry Thompson (Virginia Tech).

2010: An Analysis of ASEE-ELD Conference Proceedings: 2000-2009, David Hubbard.

2009: Assembling a Best Copy Archival Journal Collection: A Case Study of the University of California IEEE Project, Robert Heyer-Gray, Jean McKenzie, Lisa Ngo, Karen Andrews and Emily Stambaugh.

2008: SAE and Digital Rights (Mis)management or How to Marginalize Your Product, Alienate Your Customers, and Jeopardize Your Future (in Three Easy Steps), Larry Thompson.

2007: A New Paradigm for Assessing the Potential of a Digital Resource: The Paid Trail, Sasha Gurke and Lee Pedersen.

2006: Desperately Seeking Information: Where and Why Engineering Students Find the Information They Need, Theresa Barker, Julie Cook and Linda Whang (University of Washington).


Ford Motor Company Digital Librarian Award

The Ford Motor Company periodically sponsors this award to allow a new science/engineering librarian to attend the ASEE Annual Conference. The award, which will defray the cost of registration at the meeting, is given on the basis of an essay which best demonstrates an understanding and vision of the digital sci-tech library of the future.

Recipients

1999: Honora Ford Nerz
1998: Shelley Matthews
1997: Joseph Kraus
1996: Kelly Jordan


ASEE National Conference Awards received by ELD members

Recipients

2012 ASEE PIC IV Best Paper Award: Fosmire, Michael and Radcliffe, David F. Knowledge-enabled Engineering Design: Toward an Integrated Model.” Session T633, Information Literacy in Context: Enabling Real World Problem Solving. Proceedings of the ASEE 2012 Annual Conference, San Antonio, TX.

2003 Woody Everett Award, Computers in Education Division: Kolko, Beth and Whang, Linda.Assessing Reliability and Credibility for Online Engineering Resources.” Session 1520. Proceedings of the ASEE 2002 Annual Conference, Montreal, Canada.

2001 ASEE Best Conference Paper Award and PIC IV Best Paper Award: Nerz, Honora F. and Weiner, Suzanne T. “Information Competencies: A Strategic Approach.” Session 2241. Proceedings of the ASEE 2001 Annual Conference, Albuquerque, NM.

1998 ASEE PIC IV Best Paper Award: Cribb, GulcinInformation Skills Training for Engineers.” Session 1441. Proceedings of the ASEE 1998 Annual Conference, Seattle, WA.

1993 ASEE Centennial Certificate for Distinguished Service: Karen Andrews


ASEE/ELD Awards Committee

Alice Trussell, Chair, Kansas State University
Buenaventura “Ven” Basco, Jay Bhatt, Judy Brink, Julia Gelfand, Anne Glorioso, Lisha Li, James Van Loon